Faces of the world

Seaweed farm in Zanzibar

Like we said in our last blog post, it’s uncanny how you can capture the spirit, and the memories, of a place, by simply capturing in shot, a face, or body, of someone, sometimes completely unintentionally. Sometimes it’s someone you met, more often than not, it isn’t. It’s only when you look back, you see the face, the memories flood back. One face, one image, and you are transported back into the moment.

Let’s start with the one above. We’d taken a bus across Zanzibar to a remote east coast beach at Paje, not knowing of the existence of the seaweed farm where ladies like the one above worked all day, sitting all day in the water, reaping the harvest.

The second pic, below, is on a road trip across Bengal, where these cheeky boys just wanted to be in camera shot…

Cheeky Bengal boys in photograph

We were travelling way out from Kolkata, heading for the Sunderbans mangrove swamps, when the roads ran out, and the only way on was this overloaded dugout, full of locals returning to their own mangrove island after going to market. Their faces reflect their surprise at seeing two white people on the “ferry”….

Overloaded mangrove swamp boat

The next two shots are in Dar-Es-Salaam, Tanzania. When the fishing boat comes in, there’s nowhere to dock, so the only way to get the fish ashore is a human chain, standing fully clothed in the water, passing the buckets of fish from man to man. From there, there is no further journey, the fish market is right on the shore, and the guy in the second shot was only too happy to stop and pose as he filleted the fresh fish….

Fishing fleet arrives in Dar Es salaam

Dar Es salaam fish market

Skoura in Morocco was a stunning destination, a small Berber village close to the awesome Dades Gorge and on the very edge of the Sahara; after Skoura there is nothing, pretty much for ever. We were lucky enough to catch market day, where this Berber was looking to sell his wares….

Berber shepherd on market day

Sometimes the fish are so plentiful that all you need to do is drag a big net through the ocean, on foot. This lady is in Bakkhali….

The ease of fishing in Bengal

There’s not many better experiences than being in a bar where you are the only travellers and nobody cares, because it’s locals night. They’ve brought the instruments, they strike up. They play, you listen. They’re not playing for you, they’re not playing for tourists, they’re playing because it’s their night. Spanish guitars, dancing ladies. This was a brilliant night….

Impromptu music in Spanish bar

We were trekking through Ait Mansour, an oasis in deepest Morocco. We thought we wouldn’t see anyone all day, then we stumbled on Omar’s commune, where a small group of travellers from around the world were helping the oasis dwellers build an irrigation system. Omar taught us how to make herbal tea….

Berber shepherd making herbal tea

Driving down from Dikili to Foca in Turkey, we took a random detour up into the mountains, with no idea of the good fortune our detour would bring. The tiny village we approached was alive with action, and to our delight we were called in to join the celebrations, which turned out to be the celebration of a young lad who had reached puberty. The party was to celebrate his impending circumcision. The villagers were as amused by our presence as we were astonished at our luck…

Circumcision celebration in Turkish village

An inevitable stop on the roads across India is the tea or chai stop. This wonderfully photogenic lady provided not just tea but tasty sugary bites on our long journey…

Roadside tea on Indian road trip

Varanasi is perhaps the most stirring, incredible place we have visited so far, every instinct and every sense is tested, your comfort zone is a distant memory. Cremations before your eyes, masses drinking filthy water from the sacred river…..and on and on. There’s a million photos we could share, but this guy’s distant look kind of sums it all up…

On the ghats at Varanasi

And to finish… We’d long since left Varanasi, been to the mangrove swamps, and ended up in the seriously unfamiliar territory of Bakkhali on the Bengal coast, where people came and touched our skin, simply because they hadn’t seen aliens like us before. There, just a hundred yards from families on the beach, one family cremated a relative, burning the body and floating her out to sea. As the “party” broke up, two ladies stopped before us. Did they want to show their mettle by posing for us? We don’t know, but this photograph, knowing what their last few moments had entailed, is awesome.

Dignity in mourning

Many things make travel wonderful. People are one major aspect…

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